Give Clean Water to Kitehurizi Village

Clean Water for Kitehurizi Village

Uganda, Africa

Population: 240 people (50 families)

Project funded

“As a parent, I feel defeated when my children sleep hungry because there is no water to cook for them.” - Joselyn, mother of nine

Story
Latest Project News

Life in Kitehurizi: Joselyn’s Story

In the early morning hours, four of Joselyn Mbabazi’s children depart from their home in Kitehurizi village, jerry cans in hand, for a three-hour walk to the pond.

When they return, they’ll travel to school to catch a few hours of class before going back home, lifting their jerry cans, and starting the walk again.

Joselyn and her husband have nine children in Kitehurizi village. They have nine mouths to feed, and nine children to get through school.

When Joselyn can spare time from her work on the family farm and have one of the older children watch the younger ones, she’ll journey to the pond herself.

The family needs a lot of water to cook, water their farm, and drink. When the drought sets in and there is not enough water, the children cry from hunger.

“There are moments when I fetch water to cook, but the children finish it as soon as I get home and we end up staying hungry, including the very young ones,” she said.

The same water they thirst for makes them frequently ill, and treatment for water-related illnesses strains Joselyn’s family. Currently, they are debating removing Erisa, age 11, from school altogether.

He was sick from water-related illnesses last year and missed an entire year of school. They are worried illness will afflict him again and his tuition payment will be for naught.

When the family has time to work on the farm, they harvest 20 bags of corn and beans.

“It has lately dropped to only three or four bags because we have no time to work,” Joselyn said. “All the time is invested in fetching water or not working because someone is sick.”

You can help Joselyn’s family and others in Kitehurizi village today. Your gift will provide health training for each household, plus a safe water source near their village.

Lasting change means more than just building a well. Local Lifewater staff will work house by house to teach healthy habits and share the love of Christ with everyone.

Here’s what happens when you sponsor a village water project through Lifewater:

Partner with a village. Your gift kickstarts a community water project.
Teach healthy habits. Small changes make a big impact on family health.
Build a well. The village contributes up to 15% for construction.
Measure impact. Local staff track success and provide support.
Engage the church. We equip local churches to love their community.

Sponsor Kitehurizi village today.

Read More
July 20, 2019: 2 new Healthy Homes Registered

Good news–there are 2 new Healthy Homes in Kitehurizi! A home is certified healthy when a family has adopted five healthy habits: washing hands with soap and water, storing and using water safely, building and using a bathroom with a roof and door, using a drying rack to keep dishes off the ground, and keeping the area around the home safe and clean.

May 28, 2019: Village Certified ODF

When each household builds and uses their own functioning restroom, a community earns an “Open Defecation Free” (ODF) certification. Each country has their own processes and celebration for ODF villages, and it’s a huge accomplishment towards improved health for everyone.

July 19, 2019: 2 new Healthy Homes Registered

Good news–there are 2 new Healthy Homes in Kitehurizi! A home is certified healthy when a family has adopted five healthy habits: washing hands with soap and water, storing and using water safely, building and using a bathroom with a roof and door, using a drying rack to keep dishes off the ground, and keeping the area around the home safe and clean.

May 28, 2019: 2 new Healthy Homes Registered

Good news–there are 2 new Healthy Homes in Kitehurizi! A home is certified healthy when a family has adopted five healthy habits: washing hands with soap and water, storing and using water safely, building and using a bathroom with a roof and door, using a drying rack to keep dishes off the ground, and keeping the area around the home safe and clean.

April 09, 2019: 5 new Healthy Homes Registered

Good news–there are 5 new Healthy Homes in Kitehurizi! A home is certified healthy when a family has adopted five healthy habits: washing hands with soap and water, storing and using water safely, building and using a bathroom with a roof and door, using a drying rack to keep dishes off the ground, and keeping the area around the home safe and clean.

November 06, 2018: CLTS Complete

In Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS), each village goes through exercises that reveal how their current practices are making them sick, such as identifying all the places where feces are contaminating their environment. This important step equips communities to be knowledgeable about their health and willing to make changes.

September 2018: Project Ready
Read More

When you follow or donate to this
water project, you'll receive:

  • Updates

    Updates from the field

  • Progress

    Progress in the village

  • Completion

    Completion reports

Story
Latest Project News

Life in Kitehurizi: Joselyn’s Story

In the early morning hours, four of Joselyn Mbabazi’s children depart from their home in Kitehurizi village, jerry cans in hand, for a three-hour walk to the pond.

When they return, they’ll travel to school to catch a few hours of class before going back home, lifting their jerry cans, and starting the walk again.

Joselyn and her husband have nine children in Kitehurizi village. They have nine mouths to feed, and nine children to get through school.

When Joselyn can spare time from her work on the family farm and have one of the older children watch the younger ones, she’ll journey to the pond herself.

The family needs a lot of water to cook, water their farm, and drink. When the drought sets in and there is not enough water, the children cry from hunger.

“There are moments when I fetch water to cook, but the children finish it as soon as I get home and we end up staying hungry, including the very young ones,” she said.

The same water they thirst for makes them frequently ill, and treatment for water-related illnesses strains Joselyn’s family. Currently, they are debating removing Erisa, age 11, from school altogether.

He was sick from water-related illnesses last year and missed an entire year of school. They are worried illness will afflict him again and his tuition payment will be for naught.

When the family has time to work on the farm, they harvest 20 bags of corn and beans.

“It has lately dropped to only three or four bags because we have no time to work,” Joselyn said. “All the time is invested in fetching water or not working because someone is sick.”

You can help Joselyn’s family and others in Kitehurizi village today. Your gift will provide health training for each household, plus a safe water source near their village.

Lasting change means more than just building a well. Local Lifewater staff will work house by house to teach healthy habits and share the love of Christ with everyone.

Here’s what happens when you sponsor a village water project through Lifewater:

Partner with a village. Your gift kickstarts a community water project.
Teach healthy habits. Small changes make a big impact on family health.
Build a well. The village contributes up to 15% for construction.
Measure impact. Local staff track success and provide support.
Engage the church. We equip local churches to love their community.

Sponsor Kitehurizi village today.

Read More
July 20, 2019: 2 new Healthy Homes Registered

Good news–there are 2 new Healthy Homes in Kitehurizi! A home is certified healthy when a family has adopted five healthy habits: washing hands with soap and water, storing and using water safely, building and using a bathroom with a roof and door, using a drying rack to keep dishes off the ground, and keeping the area around the home safe and clean.

May 28, 2019: Village Certified ODF

When each household builds and uses their own functioning restroom, a community earns an “Open Defecation Free” (ODF) certification. Each country has their own processes and celebration for ODF villages, and it’s a huge accomplishment towards improved health for everyone.

July 19, 2019: 2 new Healthy Homes Registered

Good news–there are 2 new Healthy Homes in Kitehurizi! A home is certified healthy when a family has adopted five healthy habits: washing hands with soap and water, storing and using water safely, building and using a bathroom with a roof and door, using a drying rack to keep dishes off the ground, and keeping the area around the home safe and clean.

May 28, 2019: 2 new Healthy Homes Registered

Good news–there are 2 new Healthy Homes in Kitehurizi! A home is certified healthy when a family has adopted five healthy habits: washing hands with soap and water, storing and using water safely, building and using a bathroom with a roof and door, using a drying rack to keep dishes off the ground, and keeping the area around the home safe and clean.

April 09, 2019: 5 new Healthy Homes Registered

Good news–there are 5 new Healthy Homes in Kitehurizi! A home is certified healthy when a family has adopted five healthy habits: washing hands with soap and water, storing and using water safely, building and using a bathroom with a roof and door, using a drying rack to keep dishes off the ground, and keeping the area around the home safe and clean.

November 06, 2018: CLTS Complete

In Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS), each village goes through exercises that reveal how their current practices are making them sick, such as identifying all the places where feces are contaminating their environment. This important step equips communities to be knowledgeable about their health and willing to make changes.

September 2018: Project Ready
Read More

When you follow or donate to this
water project, you'll receive:

  • Updates

    Updates from the field

  • Progress

    Progress in the village

  • Completion

    Completion reports

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Project Milestones

  • Project Ready

    Project Ready

  • Water Committee Formed

    Water Committee Formed

  • Community Prerequisites Met

    Community Prerequisites Met

  • Construction Started

    Construction Started

  • Village Has Safe Water Source

    Village Has Safe Water Source

  • Healthy Village

    Healthy Village

Explore Kitehurizi

View live progress in Kitehurizi including healthy homes, healthy villages and more.

CLICK TO LOAD INTERACTIVE MAP

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  • Healthy School
  • Healthy Village
  • Healthy Home
  • Water Point
Show Legend

Choose a Village. See Your Impact.

  1. Select your village
    Read about a family impacted by the water crisis, then partner with their village to bring water, health, and hope.
  2. Choose how to give
    Give monthly, sponsor part of the project with a one-time gift, or join with friends and sponsor an entire village.
  3. Track Progress
    You’ll get regular updates on project funding and construction progress, including a final certificate of completion.
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Meet the Team

Lifewater field staff walk alongside each family in all our program regions with persistence, humility, and courage.

Xavier

Mbonye

Procurement and Logistics Officer

Martha

Atukwase

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Lucy

Asimo

Accounts Assistant

Santos

Ocaya

Jr. WASH Technician

Irene

Mbasalaki

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Ritah

Katongole

Accounts Assistant

Judith

Mpumwire

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Deo

Kanyankole

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

John Mary

Kasangaki

Driver

Bridget

Naikesa

Cashier

Ackline

Ainembabazi

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Persis

Nabirye

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Peter

Batambuze

Sr. Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Calvin

Babyenda

Accounts Assistant

David

Mugoya

Driver & Logistics Assistant

Peninah

Natukunda

Finance and Administration Manager

Vincent

Amaza

WASH Technician

Paul

Gabula

Driver and Logistics Assistant

Sprinter

Mukebezi

WASH Technician

Lawrance

Mukidi

Jr. WASH Technician

Philemon

Mubiru

Sanitation & Hygiene Officer

Juliet

Mugoya

Cashier

Alex

Mbaguta, MA

Uganda Country Director

Read Bio >

Joan

Kawala

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Erinest

Waswa

Church Mobilizer

Dorothy

Kwasherura

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Suzan

Katebalirwe

Human Resource Manager

Francis

Aguma

Jr. WASH Technician

Joseph

Kagezi

Sanitation & Hygiene Officer

Sanyu

Nansubuga

Accounts Assistant

Samuel

Okello

Church Mobilizer

Joseph

Balikowa

Sr. Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Catherine

Namusisi

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Tabisa

Nasirumbi

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Sylvester

Bwoye

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Thomas

Kawuzi

Sanitation and Hygiene Coordinator

Tom

Owiny

WASH Technician

Eric

Massa

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Rose

Apolot

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

David

Azoora

Area Program Manager, Kakumiro

Read Bio >

Jude

Ouga

Jr. WASH Technician

Ballam

Oyugi

Director of Program Operations

Catherine

Apio

Area Program Manager, Mayuge, Uganda

Read Bio >

Julious

Awelo

Jr. WASH Technician

Mercy

Agaba

Sanitation and Hygiene Officer

Emmanual

Kasajja

Sanitation and Hygiene Coordinator

Joyce

Sabano

Sanitation & Hygiene Officer

Fred

Batuli

Sanitation & Hygiene Officer

Grace

Orishaba

Area Program Manager, Kaliro, Uganda

Read Bio >

Jenipher

Nankya

Sanitation & Hygiene Officer

Nicholas

Agaba

Sanitation and Hygiene Coordinator

Gaitano

Okumu

Church Mobilizer

Margaret

Mbabazi

Cashier

Show More Team Members

Your donation is restricted for use within the program region for which the water project is located. Project cost estimates are established from program averages across all Lifewater programs and are based on the population size of the village. Community contributions are included in the program costs but not in the program funding goals. Real-time results are provided from the actual project sponsored. Occasionally Lifewater will receive more contributions for a given project than can be wisely applied to that project. When that happens, we use these funds to meet a similar pressing need in the same program region.

All donations are tax deductible to the full extent allowed by law. Contributions are solicited with the understanding that Lifewater has complete control over the use of all donated funds. Board-approved policy establishes that all gifts restricted for a specific project be applied to the restricted program, with up to ten percent used for administrative and fundraising purposes.